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16 October 2017

Paris to host RESIN Knowledge Transfer Workshop

The RESIN project will hold its second Knowledge Transfer in Paris (France) from 18-19 October 2017. At the workshop, Marie Gantois of the City of Paris, will share the city's goals, activities and challenges related to climate change adaptation, outline how the city has been using the RESIN project to address these challenges, and present the key results for the French capital from participation in the project so far. Miguel González Vara and Susana Ruiz Fernandez of the City of Bilbao (Spain) will discuss Bilbao’s adaptation context and activities, and present how the city is adapting to climate change through RESIN.

During the Knowledge Transfer Workshop, cities will receive interactive training on three of RESIN’s tools: Impact and Vulnerability Analysis of Vital Infrastructures and built-up Areas (IVAVIA), the Adaptation Options Library, and the e-Guide. The RESIN project’s IVAVIA tool supports and guides the process of impact and vulnerability analysis for critical infrastructures and built-up areas. The Adaptation Options Library is a searchable archive that hosts the suite of RESIN tools as well as documentation on adaptation measures implemented in different cities.

The RESIN project will hold two Knowledge Transfer Workshops and two Stakeholder Dialogues. One workshop per core city - Bratislava (Slovakia), Paris Greater Manchester (UK) and Bilbao, (Spain) - will be organised to kick-off the 2-tier group engagement. The 17 Tier 2 cities are: Alba (Italy), Almada (Portugal), Athens (Greece), Burgas (Bulgaria), London (UK), Lahti (Finland), Newcastle (UK), Nijmegen (Netherlands), Padua (Italy), Radom (Poland), Reykjavík (Iceland), Sfântu Gheorghe (Romania), Strasbourg (France), Ghent (Belgium), Vilnius (Lithuania), Warsaw (Poland) and Zadar (Croatia). Crucial local infrastructure stakeholders from the core cities will attend the workshops and exchange with their Tier 2 peers.

The first Knowledge Transfer Workshop was held in June in Bratislava. This has already led to exchange and collaboration, as Bratislava visited their Tier 2 equivalents in Reykjavik following the first Knowledge Transfer Workshop.

For more information, visit the RESIN website.

11 October 2017

Interactive training and city knowledge exchange at second Knowledge Transfer Workshop in Paris

The RESIN project will hold its second Knowledge Transfer in Paris from 18th -19th October 2017. At the workshop, Marie Gantois, city of Paris, will share the city's goals, activities and challenges related to climate change adaptation, how the city has been using the RESIN project to address these challenges, and the key outcomes for Paris from participation in the project so far. Miguel González Vara and Susana Ruiz Fernandez, city of Bilbao, will also present and discuss Bilbao’s adaptation context and activities, and how the city is adapting to climate change through RESIN.

The workshop will include interactive training on three of RESIN’s tools: Impact and Vulnerability Analysis of Vital Infrastructures and built-up Areas (IVAVIA), the Adaptation Options Library and the e-Guide. The RESIN project’s IVAVIA tool supports and guides the process of impact and vulnerability analysis for critical infrastructures and built-up areas. The Adaptation Options Library is a searchable archive that hosts the suite of RESIN tools as well as documentation on adaptation measures previously implemented in different cities. The library has a collaborative element where partners and other users can log in to upload or edit content. During the Knowledge Transfer Workshop, cities will be trained on how to use the tool’s features to select and prioritise adaptation options.

The RESIN e-Guide is designed to provide decision support for climate change adaptation planning by city administrators. It provides an overview of the various steps and activities of the urban adaptation process, and provides the practical, user-oriented support to actually perform such an adaptation process. It connects users to the most relevant sources of information and supporting methods available on the web, including providing interfaces for brand-new tools that are being developed by the RESIN partners. It helps users choose the best approaches, methods, tools and information sources for particular situations and particular steps and links with references to evidence-based information. Participants will engage with the e-Guide in a ‘Gallery Walk’, where they walk will along a physical path through the e-Guide’s topical themes and discuss and explore the more pressing and promising issues for them. The cities’ experience and impressions of the tools will be discussed and taken on board to feed into further development and dissemination of the tools.

The RESIN project will hold two Knowledge Transfer Workshops and two Stakeholder Dialogues throughout the project. One workshop per core city (Bratislava, Paris, Greater Manchester and Bilbao) will be organised in close cooperation with the core cities to kick-off the 2-tier group engagement. The 17 Tier 2 cities are: Alba (Italy), Almada (Portugal), Athens (Greece), Burgas (Bulgaria), London (UK), Lahti (Finland), Newcastle (UK), Nijmegen (Netherlands), Padua (Italy), Radom (Poland), Reykjavík (Iceland), Sfântu Gheorghe (Romania), Strasbourg (France), Ghent (Belgium), Vilnius (Lithuania), Warsaw (Poland) and Zadar (Croatia). Crucial local infrastructure stakeholders from the respective core cities will attend the workshops and exchange with their Tier 2 peers.

The first Knowledge Transfer Workshop was held in June in Bratislava. This has already led to exchange and collaboration on the initiative of the cities, as Bratislava visited their Tier 2 equivalents in Reykjavik following the first Knowledge Transfer Workshop. For more information, please see http://www.resin-cities.eu/newsroom/news-archive/?c=search&uid=c1b869ec.

9 October 2017

Smart Mature Resilience to launch new programme and workshops at Thessaloniki event

Nine ambitious local governments will join stakeholders from seven European cities in kicking off a new city collaboration programme as part of the Smart Mature Resilience (SMR) project at a Stakeholder Dialogue in Thessaloniki (Greece) on 7 November 2017.

The event will see participating cities sharing and exchanging local government policies and tools for strategically building city resilience. European cities are facing increasingly frequent and intense hazards and risks as climate change and changing social demographics place their critical infrastructures under increasing pressure. Sharing good practices can help them plan ahead for known and unknown shocks and stresses.

As part of the SMR project, three so-called “Tier 1” cities, Glasgow (UK), Kristiansand (Norway) and Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain), have co-developed a suite of tools to support them and other cities in planning, budgeting and identifying replicable policies towards their resilience goals. A second group of “Tier 2” cities, Bristol (UK), Riga (Latvia), Rome (Italy) and Vejle (Denmark), has been closely observing and providing feedback on this process.

At the one-day Stakeholder Dialogue, these cities will share their knowledge of these tools and contextualise them in terms of real policies to a new group of “Tier 3” cities including Amman (Jordan), Athens (Greece), Greater Manchester (UK), Malaga (Spain), Malmö (Sweden), Reykjavik (Iceland), Stirling (UK) and Thessaloniki (Greece). The event will be officially opened by the Mayor of Thessaloniki, Yiannis Boutaris.

Research as part of SMR has found that cities and their critical infrastructure are interdependent, and that cities can help further boost their own resilience by supporting and fostering resilience in other cities. SMR is supporting the potential for replication by working towards international standards in city resilience management.

The first CEN workshop initiated by SMR, spearheaded by German standardisation organisation DIN, CEN WS/88 - Functional Specification for a Resilience Information Portal is underway. Two further envisaged CEN Workshop Agreements, City Resilience Development - Maturity Model and City Resilience Development - Operational Guidance, will kick off in Thessaloniki on 8 November, following the Stakeholder Dialogue. To join the standardization processes, please contact rene.lindner@din.de.

For further information, visit the project website.

2 October 2017

City of Bratislava exchanges with Reykjavik's Experts on Climate Change Adaptation in Iceland

The capital city of Bratislava participated in the 8th international conference of the Society for Disaster Risk Management "Dimensions of Disaster Risk Reduction and Society Resilience in a Complex World" which took place on 23-25 August, in Reykjavík (Iceland). In addition to the conference, the Office of the Chief Architect represented the RESIN project in a visit the City Hall of Reykjavík in order to meet the city's experts for climate change adaptation, whom they first met during the 1st Knowledge Transfer Workshop organised by ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability in Bratislava on 12-13 June 2017.

Among the main topics of the conference were the increase in natural disasters due to climate change such as drought, floods, forest fires and overheating of the urban environment, which also resonate with Central Europe and Bratislava. The city of Bratislava presented outputs from several projects that are related to climate change risk. One of the contributions focused on Bratislava´s experience in the RESIN project, which was prepared together with Faculty of Natural Sciences of the UK in Bratislava and Fraunhofer Institute for Intelligent Analysis and Information Systems in Germany. The aim was to provide insight on how tools for reducing climate change risks and impacts are developed by researchers and later tested and used by the four city partners in the project. In Bratislava city, these tools are tested and in order to be finally used in urban planning, adaptation planning and decision making, which is in the project referred to as the process of co-creation. The presentation summed up the lessons learned from RESIN and from practical work on the side of implementation of blue and green adaptation measures. The take-home message for Bratislava from this conference is that adaptation planning goes beyond building green and blue infrastructure and should also encompass the planning of preparedness for climate change hazards and minimising the risk they impose for health of citizens but also damage or loss to property, with a special focus on awareness raising and communication in risk management.

Thanks to the cooperation as part of the RESIN project among 1-tier and 2-tier cities, it was possible to meet the representatives of Reykjavík City hall, who also participated in the 1st Knowledge Transfer Workshop and exchange experience with the implementation of adaptation measures in a dynamically changing urban environment that has to withstand the adverse impacts of climate change, such as heavy rainfall and other extreme weather events. In Reykjavik, this problem is solved by diverting water from roads and other impermeable areas to areas that are covered with vegetation or wetlands. Despite the fact that Iceland uses almost exclusively renewable energy (geothermal and water) to meet its energy needs, Reykjavik plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions also by revitalizing wetlands and urban greenery, including its woody component, which can absorb most greenhouse gases. An example of such a wetland is the Vatnsmýrin, which was revitalized on the territory of the city near the University of Iceland and includes an educational walkway that brings its significance closer to visitors and residents of the city.

Like Reykjavik, the capital city of Bratislava is balancing the need for urban development and densification with pleasant and safe urban environment for living. For Bratislava, this mostly concerns reintroducing green areas into the city, which would make the city's microclimate more pleasant during heatwaves and help prevent damage after extremely heavy rainfall. Pilot projects of such adaptation measures have been carried out within the framework of the "Bratislava is preparing for climate change" project, financed by the EEA grants and Norways Grants (project duration 2014-2017).

"Bratislava has had an active approach in adaption to climate change and protecting drinking water resources. Through the presentation of individual projects, it will be possible to continue to cooperate in the future and to establish contacts with foreign partners in implementing concrete measures to increase the adaptation of cities to climate change," said Ingrid Konrad, Chief Architect, City of Bratislava.