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RESIN project: to support resilient cities and their infrastructures

11 December 2017

RESIN project: to support resilient cities and their infrastructures

Horizon 2020 RESIN project develops standardised approaches to increase the resilience of Europe’s cities and urban areas to extreme weather and climate change. RESIN has a specific focus on ensuring that critical infrastructures are better integrated into this process.

The heart of the RESIN project's approach lies in the co-creation between the partner cities and the research institutes developing the products of the project. This process is actively supported by ICLEI (as a city network and knowledge brokerage organisation) and Arcadis from the viewpoint of a consultancy company.

The main products of the RESIN project include:

- A typology for European cities for adaptation to climate change that can be used to identify cities and regions with similar risk and adaptation profile;
- Detailed guidance for an impact and vulnerability analysis (IVAVIA) including tools such as an impact chain diagram creator, and aggregation and calculation support;
- A database of possible adaptation options with due attention for harmonisation of effectiveness and cost-efficiency information;
- Standardised methods for prioritising between these adaptation measures which will be an input for an adaptation pathway design;
- A common unifying framework for the adaptation decision making process, with associated methods, tools and datasets created to support decision-making at appropriate stages, in the form of an e-Guide;
- Inputs for the international and European Standardisation organisations to enhance the standardisation of approaches in climate change adaptation.

The policy implications of the RESIN project: Panel discussion in a project meeting in November 2017


At the occasion of the RESIN November 2017 consortium meeting held in Brussels, a panel discussed the outcomes of the project in the light of EU policies and European urban challenges:

- the urban risk typology have a value both for individual cities, allowing them to identify and learn from comparable cities, and for national and EU institutions, that can use the typology for developing policies and distributing funding covering the variety of cities and regions in Europe;
- equally all the harmonisation and standardization work within RESIN is beneficial for the cities and their stakeholders as it improves the quality of risk assessments and adaptation strategy making, and it contributes to more comparability between cities;
- from the audience the development of a “stress-test” for cities to demonstrate where they are vulnerable to current and future extreme weather conditions was recommended;
- a recurring topic was the value added of the co-creation process that is at the heart of the project. While it obviously contributes to the development of tools that are better and more widely applicable, it also contributes to the scientific quality of the research. The consortium was invited to publish on this aspect.

If you are interested in learning more about this project, don't miss RESIN upcoming events:
- RESIN Stakeholder Dialogue," Solutions for strategic adaptation planning in European cities“, 1st February 2018, Manchester, UK.
- Open European Day at Bonn Resilient Cities, 25th April 2018, Bonn, Germany.

RESIN meeting looks to the future of urban climate change adaptation

1 December 2017

RESIN meeting looks to the future of urban climate change adaptation

The RESIN project consortium met in Brussels (Belgium) on 23-24 November 2017 to consider the project outputs in an international policy context and to plan for the project’s final year.

Cities in Europe are approaching a crucial time in terms of finding solutions for climate change adaptation. RESIN is optimally placed to advise and guide policy developments on a local and international level on the topic of urban adaptation.

The RESIN partner cities have been central players in the RESIN project, providing knowledge to improve the project tools’ quality. Alberto Terenzi, ICLEI Europe, explained: “We wanted to adjust the timing of the tool development to match cities’ needs.” The RESIN cities have already begun using the tools, and have made progress on adaptation with them despite the tools not being developed to completion.

The Impact and Vulnerability Analysis (IVAVIA) tool helps to link vulnerability and risk. Manchester and Bilbao (Spain) have been central in the development of this tool and have both developed impact chains as part of the process. Up to now, Greater Manchester has completed a case study, baseline assessment, priority impact chains and a two-stage risk assessment, with flood risk and transport infrastructure a particular focus.

Mikel González-Vara, Manager of Environmental Strategy, City of Bilbao, said: “We have to connect to our environment. We are four cities, but surrounding us there are further cities with related problems.”

Bilbao is looking ahead to the city’s new Adaptation Plan, which will be submitted next year. As part of RESIN, Bilbao developed an impact chain for flooding in built-up areas. This is a very real and immediate risk for the rainy coastal city. Similarly, Bratislava (Slovakia) is planning to use the RESIN adaptation options library to evaluate the action plan for climate change adaptation progress every two years.

The tools of the RESIN project are useful as a complementary combined suite of tools, hosted in an online guidance platform called the “eGuide”. The final RESIN tools will be launched in spring 2018. RESIN will hold its first public event aimed at city practitioners in Greater Manchester on 1 February 2018.

For more information, visit the RESIN project website.

RESIN maps out the next steps in solutions for strategic adaptation planning in European cities at Brussels meeting

28 November 2017

RESIN maps out the next steps in solutions for strategic adaptation planning in European cities at Brussels meeting

The RESIN project consortium met in Brussels on 23-24 November 2017 to consider the project outputs in an international policy context and to invite guidance from the projects Advisory Board and reviewers.
The RESIN project’s ideal partnership of pioneering research experts and active city representatives uniquely position the project as creators of a complete adaptation action package. The RESIN tools, which are now nearing completion, will be the first of their kind, going beyond local cases and consolidating accumulated experience and knowledge to generate reliable, evidence-supported toolkits that will be both scientifically novel and user-friendly.

“We are approaching a crucial time in terms of solution finding.”

Diogo de Gusmao-Soerensen (DG Research, Head of Climate Services) stressed the importance of impact and policy relevance of research projects. As a European-funded project, RESIN is optimally placed to advise and guide policy developments on a local and international level on the topic of climate change adaptation in cities. Developments at the recent 2017 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP23) held in Bonn (Germany) showed that the issues addressed in this project are crucial. This topic of research and discussion is incredibly important and pertinent. European Union member states have made vital commitments to climate change at COP23 and must lead and bolster their peers in the international community to commit to climate change action.

“To some communities around the world, climate change of 1.5 degrees is high end climate change.”
An appeal was made to the project consortium to ensure that the high-end scenarios are taken on board when dealing with resilience. It is also important to take into account the economic aspects of adaptation and to focus on finding and offering solution to climate change adaptation challenges.

“We wanted to adjust the timing of the tool development to match cities’ needs.”

The RESIN partner cities have been central players in the RESIN project. While the original concept of the project was that the four core cities of Greater Manchester, Bratislava, Bilbao and Paris would test the tools developed by the research institutions, this relationship has developed to involve the cities in an even more central role. The project has aimed for optimal compatibility between tool development and strategic development in the cities by adjusting the timing of the tool development with the city’s local milestones. Further than the cities’ knowledge being applied to improve the tools’ quality, the RESIN cities have been able to already make progress on adaptation through the tools before the tools have even been developed to completion. Workshops focusing on knowledge transfer workshops showed the success of the co-creation process, as they demonstrated that the tools were also applicable to external (Tier 2) cities.

“Having something red green and amber for risk registries can be useful for cities.”

In terms of linking vulnerability and risk assessment, the Impact and Vulnerability Analysis (IVAVIA) tool has been a useful step as part of the co-creation process. Adaptation has been placed high on the agenda in the RESIN partner cities. The RESIN cities of Manchester and Bilbao have been central in the development of this tool and have both developed impact chains as part of the process.

Greater Manchester carried out a process of consultation to establish which impact chains to develop. Two were selected: road transport and green infrastructure. Supported by their RESIN co-creation partner, the Fraunhofer Institute, they held initial stakeholder workshops to establish the impact chains. This work aims to support decision-makers in Greater Manchester to push forward the adaptation and resilience agenda. Up to now, Greater Manchester has completed a case study, baseline assessment, priority impact chains and a two-stage risk assessment. Flood risk and transport infrastructure are a particular focus.

“We have to connect to our environment. We are four cities, but surrounding us there are further cities with related problems.”

Bilbao is looking ahead to the city’s new Adaptation Plan, which will be submitted next year. As part of their work on the development of IVAVIA, Bilbao developed an impact chain for flooding in built-up areas. This is a very real and immediate risk for the rainy coastal city. An impact chain was also developed about the impact of extreme precipitation on city traffic infrastructure. The process in Bilbao has shown the importance of cross-cutting data administration and the need for co-creation, not only within the RESIN project but to improve projects across the municipality.

Bratislava has been working with Tecnalia to develop a database of adaptation options. In the case of Bratislava, this co-creation process has been very closely linked to strategic processes in the city. Bratislava published a new “Action plan for adaptation to negative effects of climate change” in 2017. The city is planning to use the RESIN adaptation options library to evaluate the action plan for climate change adaptation progress every two years.

Bratislava found the adaptation options library to be useful for a number of purposes:
1) Adaptation planning for relevant departments, together with the outcomes of the vulnerability assessment
2) Preparing new concept and strategies for design of public space
3) For meeting standards and limits set by competition rules

The tools of the RESIN project are useful as a complementary combined suite of tools, which provide cities with comprehensive decision support taking them though the whole climate change adaptation planning process. This suite is hosted in an online guidance platform called the “eGuide”. A prototype eGuide is already available online at e-guide.resin.itti.com.pl. An update is planned for Spring 2018 and the final version will be released in Autumn 2018.

The eGuide has been developed for and by the end users. It provides practical information, guidance, the suite of RESIN tools and a structure to document and save the reports and materials a city develops as part of the climate change adaptation planning process. This answers to the reality in cities where strategies can develop over several years, and in the case of staff circulation, new staff need an integrated platform to find information on processes that may span across several municipal departments and involve public-private actors.

The final RESIN tools will be launched in Spring 2018. RESIN will hold its first public event aimed at city practitioners in Greater Manchester on 1st February: Solutions for strategic adaptation planning in European cities.

ICLEI's SMR project website wins .eu Web Award

27 November 2017

ICLEI's SMR project website wins .eu Web Award

The Smart Mature Resilience (SMR) website, developed and managed by the ICLEI European Secretariat in Freiburg (Germany), was awarded the .eu Web Award 2017 in "The Laurels" category at a prestigious ceremony in Brussels (Belgium) on 21 November. The award ceremony was organised by EURid, the registration system for the .eu domain name on behalf of the European Commission.

In “The Laurels” category, the best websites for education, institutions and European projects compete for the award. Thanks to consistently high communication competence and content quality, ICLEI was able to win the award for a second year in a row. In 2016, ICLEI won the award in the “Better World” category for the www.mobilityweek.eu website. The winning website receives a video about the project and the website.

Speaking about the award, Ruud Schuthof, ICLEI Europe Deputy Regional Director for communications, said: "The .eu web award is a great honour for ICLEI and is a recognition of ICLEI's quality and longstanding experience in the field of communication on the topic of sustainability in cities. To have won the award for the second time confirms our work's merit."

Jose Maria Sarriegi, coordinator of the SMR project, added: “It is an honor to be recognised as the best webpage in the Laurels category of the Eurid web awards. We hope this award will increase the number of cities using the tools available in our website, which is our main objective.”

For more information about the SMR project, visit the project website.

Strengthening Europe's resilience backbone: 9 new cities join SMR at Thessaloniki launch event

13 November 2017

Strengthening Europe's resilience backbone: 9 new cities join SMR at Thessaloniki launch event

Representatives of 19 cities and municipalities met in Thessaloniki on 7th November for the Smart Mature Resilience project's Stakeholder Dialogue event. 9 cities became the newest members of the SMR project, joining the project’s 7 cities, which have been working with researchers for the last 2 years to develop tools to support cities in strategically developing their resilience. The cities to join the Tier 3 group were identified on the basis of experience and knowledge of resilience development. The event marked the launch of the project's third circle of cities aiming to build a backbone of resilient cities in Europe.

Four of the cities have developed this knowledge through membership of ICLEI: the Greater Amman Municipality (Jordan), Malmö (Sweden), Münster (Germany) and Rekjavik (Iceland), or participation in projects like the RESIN project (www.resin-cities.eu) in partnership with ICLEI, in the case of Greater Manchester (United Kingdom), or are part of other projects and international networks: Athens (Greece), Malaga (Spain), Stirling (United Kingdom) and Thessaloniki (Greece).

As a true dialogue, the new cities were active contributors to the event as well as receiving training from the project's Tier 1 and Tier 2 cities and research partners. Aphrodite Bouikidis, Resilient Thessaloniki, presented Thessaloniki's Resilience Strategy, presenting the city's general resilience goals: Shape a Thriving and Sustainable City, Co-create an Inclusive City, Build a Dynamic Urban Economy and Responsive City and Re-discover the City's Relationship with the Sea.

Giorgos Dimarelos, Deputy Mayor for Urban Resilience and Development Planning, shared Thessaloniki’s journey towards resilience amid intense challenges, including the financial crisis, the challenge of integrating refugees, and adverse weather effects from climate change. Steps by the city council have produced positive results in creating cooperative relationships with stakeholders, establishing a promising basis for achieving the city's goals, such as tackling unemployment and re-establishing a meaningful connection between the city and its coastline. The Deputy Mayor demonstrated how the city had successfully won support from the regional government to develop the coastline area in collaboration with neighbouring municipalities.

The cities of Kristiansand, Greater Manchester and San Sebastian are, like Thessaloniki, coastal cities, and each city shared their experience with working with critical infrastructure providers, first responders and citizens to deal with crisis situations caused by flooding, and to develop preparedness and resilience to flooding as part of the cities' daily work. Kristiansand and San Sebastian are applying the tools of the SMR project to conduct self-assessment and audit of the city's policies and current levels of investment in resilience, as well as considering the interdependencies of risk using the Risk Systemicity Questionnaire (RSQ). These cities are now serving as guides and peer trainers to their Tier 3 partner cities to pass on the knowledge they have developed through the SMR project.

The city of Amman, Jordan, shares challenges with some European cities. The population in the city has more than doubled in the last decade due to the war in neighbouring Syria, and the municipality has been working overtime to provide support to the new inhabitants and stretch the city’s infrastructure and housing to accommodate the unprecedented population pressures. Its ICLEI member peer, Malmö, has also introduced programmes in response to refugees seeking asylum from war, and the cities could compare challenges, risks and policies that have been implemented in both cities.

The event proceeded with training on the SMR City Dynamics Model. Cities were divided into groups and played the project's serious game to play in a simulation sandbox and experiment with the effects of different budget options. As budget experiments cannot be carried out in real life in cities, simulations provide a way for practitioners and decision-makers to try out different investment options in a safe environment. The game helps users to better understand the Resilience Maturity Model and to see through trial and error playing, the significant benefit of implementing policies in the order laid out in the Resilience Maturity Model.

The cities participated in a training session on the SMR Risk Systemicity Questionnaire (RSQ). The participants were divided into 5 groups, with a mix of city representatives in each group. Each group was facilitated by a Tier 1 or 2 city representative who had been involved in the development of the RSQ, with support from Strathclyde or an experienced user of the RSQ. Each group addressed different topics in the RSQ: Public Unrest; Elderly; Social Cohesion; Critical Infrastructure; Climate Change – air pollution.

There was a high level of debate and involvement about risk scenarios and potential strategies that could be implemented to prepare for interconnected risks. The groups were able to experience focused discussion on risk scenarios in cities facilitated by use of the RSQ. The Tier 3 cities were able to quickly understand how the tool worked and were able to use in in a trial run in practice. Some Tier 3 cities were already confident in their plans to run RSQ-based workshops locally.

Clara Grimes (ICLEI Europe) trained the cities on approaches for communicating best practices for resilience in cities based on narrative methods. Effectively communicating projects and policies in story form is essential so that citizens, stakeholders, other departments of the municipality and the media can better understand and connect with a city’s aims and progress. The cities of Stirling (UK), Malmö (Sweden), Glasgow (UK), Vejle (Denmark) and Rome (Italy) then applied these methods to tell the story of their local best practices to the cities and stakeholders present at the event, including community group activities in Stirling, crisis management in Malmö, resilience education in schools in Glasgow and a programme where a design school ‘designed’ ways for severely disabled people to make meaningful friendships beyond their professional relationships with their carers. Further resilience stories are available for reference in the SMR Policies Tool. Finally, researchers from the Center for Integrated Emergency Management presented on the SMR Resilience Information Portal and how cities can pick and choose code from this portal toolbox to supplement their resilience management information infrastructure.

The Tier 3 programme will continue with online training webinars and an in-person Stakeholder Workshop as part of the Breakfast at Sustainability's event series in Brussels on 7th March.

Paris to host RESIN Knowledge Transfer Workshop

16 October 2017

Paris to host RESIN Knowledge Transfer Workshop

The RESIN project will hold its second Knowledge Transfer in Paris (France) from 18-19 October 2017. At the workshop, Marie Gantois of the City of Paris, will share the city's goals, activities and challenges related to climate change adaptation, outline how the city has been using the RESIN project to address these challenges, and present the key results for the French capital from participation in the project so far. Miguel González Vara and Susana Ruiz Fernandez of the City of Bilbao (Spain) will discuss Bilbao’s adaptation context and activities, and present how the city is adapting to climate change through RESIN.

During the Knowledge Transfer Workshop, cities will receive interactive training on three of RESIN’s tools: Impact and Vulnerability Analysis of Vital Infrastructures and built-up Areas (IVAVIA), the Adaptation Options Library, and the e-Guide. The RESIN project’s IVAVIA tool supports and guides the process of impact and vulnerability analysis for critical infrastructures and built-up areas. The Adaptation Options Library is a searchable archive that hosts the suite of RESIN tools as well as documentation on adaptation measures implemented in different cities.

The RESIN project will hold two Knowledge Transfer Workshops and two Stakeholder Dialogues. One workshop per core city - Bratislava (Slovakia), Paris Greater Manchester (UK) and Bilbao, (Spain) - will be organised to kick-off the 2-tier group engagement. The 17 Tier 2 cities are: Alba (Italy), Almada (Portugal), Athens (Greece), Burgas (Bulgaria), London (UK), Lahti (Finland), Newcastle (UK), Nijmegen (Netherlands), Padua (Italy), Radom (Poland), Reykjavík (Iceland), Sfântu Gheorghe (Romania), Strasbourg (France), Ghent (Belgium), Vilnius (Lithuania), Warsaw (Poland) and Zadar (Croatia). Crucial local infrastructure stakeholders from the core cities will attend the workshops and exchange with their Tier 2 peers.

The first Knowledge Transfer Workshop was held in June in Bratislava. This has already led to exchange and collaboration, as Bratislava visited their Tier 2 equivalents in Reykjavik following the first Knowledge Transfer Workshop.

For more information, visit the RESIN website.

Interactive training and city knowledge exchange at second Knowledge Transfer Workshop in Paris

11 October 2017

Interactive training and city knowledge exchange at second Knowledge Transfer Workshop in Paris

The RESIN project will hold its second Knowledge Transfer in Paris from 18th -19th October 2017. At the workshop, Marie Gantois, city of Paris, will share the city's goals, activities and challenges related to climate change adaptation, how the city has been using the RESIN project to address these challenges, and the key outcomes for Paris from participation in the project so far. Miguel González Vara and Susana Ruiz Fernandez, city of Bilbao, will also present and discuss Bilbao’s adaptation context and activities, and how the city is adapting to climate change through RESIN.

The workshop will include interactive training on three of RESIN’s tools: Impact and Vulnerability Analysis of Vital Infrastructures and built-up Areas (IVAVIA), the Adaptation Options Library and the e-Guide. The RESIN project’s IVAVIA tool supports and guides the process of impact and vulnerability analysis for critical infrastructures and built-up areas. The Adaptation Options Library is a searchable archive that hosts the suite of RESIN tools as well as documentation on adaptation measures previously implemented in different cities. The library has a collaborative element where partners and other users can log in to upload or edit content. During the Knowledge Transfer Workshop, cities will be trained on how to use the tool’s features to select and prioritise adaptation options.

The RESIN e-Guide is designed to provide decision support for climate change adaptation planning by city administrators. It provides an overview of the various steps and activities of the urban adaptation process, and provides the practical, user-oriented support to actually perform such an adaptation process. It connects users to the most relevant sources of information and supporting methods available on the web, including providing interfaces for brand-new tools that are being developed by the RESIN partners. It helps users choose the best approaches, methods, tools and information sources for particular situations and particular steps and links with references to evidence-based information. Participants will engage with the e-Guide in a ‘Gallery Walk’, where they walk will along a physical path through the e-Guide’s topical themes and discuss and explore the more pressing and promising issues for them. The cities’ experience and impressions of the tools will be discussed and taken on board to feed into further development and dissemination of the tools.

The RESIN project will hold two Knowledge Transfer Workshops and two Stakeholder Dialogues throughout the project. One workshop per core city (Bratislava, Paris, Greater Manchester and Bilbao) will be organised in close cooperation with the core cities to kick-off the 2-tier group engagement. The 17 Tier 2 cities are: Alba (Italy), Almada (Portugal), Athens (Greece), Burgas (Bulgaria), London (UK), Lahti (Finland), Newcastle (UK), Nijmegen (Netherlands), Padua (Italy), Radom (Poland), Reykjavík (Iceland), Sfântu Gheorghe (Romania), Strasbourg (France), Ghent (Belgium), Vilnius (Lithuania), Warsaw (Poland) and Zadar (Croatia). Crucial local infrastructure stakeholders from the respective core cities will attend the workshops and exchange with their Tier 2 peers.

The first Knowledge Transfer Workshop was held in June in Bratislava. This has already led to exchange and collaboration on the initiative of the cities, as Bratislava visited their Tier 2 equivalents in Reykjavik following the first Knowledge Transfer Workshop. For more information, please see http://www.resin-cities.eu/newsroom/news-archive/?c=search&uid=c1b869ec.

Smart Mature Resilience to launch new programme and workshops at Thessaloniki event

9 October 2017

Smart Mature Resilience to launch new programme and workshops at Thessaloniki event

Nine ambitious local governments will join stakeholders from seven European cities in kicking off a new city collaboration programme as part of the Smart Mature Resilience (SMR) project at a Stakeholder Dialogue in Thessaloniki (Greece) on 7 November 2017.

The event will see participating cities sharing and exchanging local government policies and tools for strategically building city resilience. European cities are facing increasingly frequent and intense hazards and risks as climate change and changing social demographics place their critical infrastructures under increasing pressure. Sharing good practices can help them plan ahead for known and unknown shocks and stresses.

As part of the SMR project, three so-called “Tier 1” cities, Glasgow (UK), Kristiansand (Norway) and Donostia/San Sebastian (Spain), have co-developed a suite of tools to support them and other cities in planning, budgeting and identifying replicable policies towards their resilience goals. A second group of “Tier 2” cities, Bristol (UK), Riga (Latvia), Rome (Italy) and Vejle (Denmark), has been closely observing and providing feedback on this process.

At the one-day Stakeholder Dialogue, these cities will share their knowledge of these tools and contextualise them in terms of real policies to a new group of “Tier 3” cities including Amman (Jordan), Athens (Greece), Greater Manchester (UK), Malaga (Spain), Malmö (Sweden), Reykjavik (Iceland), Stirling (UK) and Thessaloniki (Greece). The event will be officially opened by the Mayor of Thessaloniki, Yiannis Boutaris.

Research as part of SMR has found that cities and their critical infrastructure are interdependent, and that cities can help further boost their own resilience by supporting and fostering resilience in other cities. SMR is supporting the potential for replication by working towards international standards in city resilience management.

The first CEN workshop initiated by SMR, spearheaded by German standardisation organisation DIN, CEN WS/88 - Functional Specification for a Resilience Information Portal is underway. Two further envisaged CEN Workshop Agreements, City Resilience Development - Maturity Model and City Resilience Development - Operational Guidance, will kick off in Thessaloniki on 8 November, following the Stakeholder Dialogue. To join the standardization processes, please contact rene.lindner@din.de.

For further information, visit the project website.

City of Bratislava exchanges with Reykjavik's Experts on Climate Change Adaptation in Iceland

2 October 2017

City of Bratislava exchanges with Reykjavik's Experts on Climate Change Adaptation in Iceland

The capital city of Bratislava participated in the 8th international conference of the Society for Disaster Risk Management "Dimensions of Disaster Risk Reduction and Society Resilience in a Complex World" which took place on 23-25 August, in Reykjavík (Iceland). In addition to the conference, the Office of the Chief Architect represented the RESIN project in a visit the City Hall of Reykjavík in order to meet the city's experts for climate change adaptation, whom they first met during the 1st Knowledge Transfer Workshop organised by ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability in Bratislava on 12-13 June 2017.

Among the main topics of the conference were the increase in natural disasters due to climate change such as drought, floods, forest fires and overheating of the urban environment, which also resonate with Central Europe and Bratislava. The city of Bratislava presented outputs from several projects that are related to climate change risk. One of the contributions focused on Bratislava´s experience in the RESIN project, which was prepared together with Faculty of Natural Sciences of the UK in Bratislava and Fraunhofer Institute for Intelligent Analysis and Information Systems in Germany. The aim was to provide insight on how tools for reducing climate change risks and impacts are developed by researchers and later tested and used by the four city partners in the project. In Bratislava city, these tools are tested and in order to be finally used in urban planning, adaptation planning and decision making, which is in the project referred to as the process of co-creation. The presentation summed up the lessons learned from RESIN and from practical work on the side of implementation of blue and green adaptation measures. The take-home message for Bratislava from this conference is that adaptation planning goes beyond building green and blue infrastructure and should also encompass the planning of preparedness for climate change hazards and minimising the risk they impose for health of citizens but also damage or loss to property, with a special focus on awareness raising and communication in risk management.

Thanks to the cooperation as part of the RESIN project among 1-tier and 2-tier cities, it was possible to meet the representatives of Reykjavík City hall, who also participated in the 1st Knowledge Transfer Workshop and exchange experience with the implementation of adaptation measures in a dynamically changing urban environment that has to withstand the adverse impacts of climate change, such as heavy rainfall and other extreme weather events. In Reykjavik, this problem is solved by diverting water from roads and other impermeable areas to areas that are covered with vegetation or wetlands. Despite the fact that Iceland uses almost exclusively renewable energy (geothermal and water) to meet its energy needs, Reykjavik plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions also by revitalizing wetlands and urban greenery, including its woody component, which can absorb most greenhouse gases. An example of such a wetland is the Vatnsmýrin, which was revitalized on the territory of the city near the University of Iceland and includes an educational walkway that brings its significance closer to visitors and residents of the city.

Like Reykjavik, the capital city of Bratislava is balancing the need for urban development and densification with pleasant and safe urban environment for living. For Bratislava, this mostly concerns reintroducing green areas into the city, which would make the city's microclimate more pleasant during heatwaves and help prevent damage after extremely heavy rainfall. Pilot projects of such adaptation measures have been carried out within the framework of the "Bratislava is preparing for climate change" project, financed by the EEA grants and Norways Grants (project duration 2014-2017).

"Bratislava has had an active approach in adaption to climate change and protecting drinking water resources. Through the presentation of individual projects, it will be possible to continue to cooperate in the future and to establish contacts with foreign partners in implementing concrete measures to increase the adaptation of cities to climate change," said Ingrid Konrad, Chief Architect, City of Bratislava.

News from related resilience projects

29 September 2017

News from related resilience projects

The EPICURO project has published their Urban Resilience SWOT Analysis Guidance: http://www.epicurocp.eu/2017/08/07/epicuro-task-b-swot-analysis-peer-peer-workshop-meeting-salaspils-2-august-2017/. The aim of such guidance is to enable Partner Cities to analyze local issues, with the engagement and contribution of stakeholders in creating Urban Resilience Strategic Teams (URST), and thereby also identify the best practices which can be applied and transferred through the LASPs.

The GRACeFUL project has published their latest newsletter. Read it on the GRACeFUL project website.